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dysport

what is Dysport?

Botox and Dysport are both Botulinum Toxin A but are made by different companies. Botox has been available for longer, but Dysport is now FDA approved and has been found to be as effective and safe as Botox. It is a bit different to use from a physician standpoint, but for the patients it is pretty much the same as Botox. Best yet, Dysport is less expensive for the same effect. This is the great thing about competition.

Dysport cost

Dysport injection is a medical procedure that requires nuance, experience and expertise. All Botox providers are not equal in education or skill and some are actually quite poor. Most Botox providers charge either by the amount of Botox used or by the region of the face treated. Shopping around for cheap Botox is not recommended. There are practitioners than offer bargain prices that are not sustainable from a business standpoint. They may be diluting their Botox or injecting less units than advertised.

Dysport vs Botox

Because of Dysport formula and structural differences, it behaves a bit differently in the body  than Botox does. Dysp. tends to diffuse more, causing it to spread out over a broader area after it’s injected. This can be beneficial when treating a larger area, such as wide forehead wrinkles, and areas with thinner muscles, such as crows’ feet

Greater diffusion means fewer injections to achieve desired results, and fewer injections mean less discomfort. It also means that Dysport may not work as well for treating small areas or areas with thicker muscles, such as the space between your eyebrows or around your mouth. While an experienced injection specialist who knows facial musculature quite well can control the diffusion and keep the treatment area very specific, Botox may simply be better for some areas and Dysport for others.

Additionally, some people who have not responded to Botox report that Dysport works well for them; these are personal reports that don’t yet have clinical proof to support them

dysport
dysport

Dysport side effects

The dosage used for cosmetic treatments is relatively small, and its side effects are generally mild. Here again, it’s fairly similar to Botox.

There may be some stinging or burning sensations during the injection as well as swelling or bruising afterward. You may also feel some pain where Dysport was injected or have a skin reaction to the formula, including redness, itching or rash. You might experience a heavy feeling at the injection site; this usually disappears within a couple of weeks.

Some people report headaches or cold and flu-like symptoms, such as a runny nose, sore throat or respiratory symptoms. You may also experience dry mouth and tiredness. These are all temporary and usually minimal. The injection area might feel numb as well, and due to the nature of the treatment, there will be little or no facial movement in the treated area.

While dysport, like Botox, is considered safe in its small doses, the main ingredient is the toxin that causes botulism. There is a possibility of it spreading to other areas and causing more severe problems within hours or weeks after an injection. These Dysport side effects can include drooping eyebrows or eyelids, blurred vision, difficulty speaking, hoarseness, muscle weakness, loss of bladder control, and trouble breathing or swallowing. These are seen more often with the larger doses used for medical conditions, but the possibility does exist with cosmetic doses, though that possibility is exceptionally small. Seek medical care right away if these occur.  A thorough medical history provided to your licensed medical injection specialist will help prevent any serious side effects from occurring.

Severe reactions are rare, but if you’re allergic to any of the ingredients in Dysport, you might experience trouble breathing, speaking or swallowing. Again, seek immediate care if these occur. Less severe allergic symptoms could include itching, rash, wheezing, dizziness, fainting or asthma symptoms. You should also seek medical care with these symptoms.  Be sure to report any and all allergies you have to your injection specialist during your consultation, including allergies to medications, anesthetics and food.

The lactose in Dysport comes from cow’s milk. It rarely causes intolerance problems because it doesn’t enter the digestive system; however, it could cause allergic reactions for patients who are allergic to dairy products. The formula contains human albumin as well, which is a protein found in normal blood plasma. This, too, rarely causes problems but is worth listing. The botulinum toxin already discussed is the third main ingredient and is safely used for cosmetic purposes.  There have been no reported cases of botulism from cosmetic Botox and Dysp. injections as of the date of this article’s publication.

Pregnancy and Lactation

Women who are pregnant, who are planning to be pregnant or who are breastfeeding shouldn’t receive Dysport. People with neuromuscular conditions should also avoid treatment. Other conditions can be problematic too, and there can be negative medication interactions as well. Be sure to disclose all your health conditions and medicines to your medically licensed injection specialist before receiving treatment.

How long after Dysport injection can I fly?

It is safe to travel immediately after  Botox injection , however  pressure differential in the cabin  might increase bruising and swelling in the injected area , Moreover  stooping to pick up a piece of luggage during the first  hours or lying down during flight  might cause the Botox to diffuse into surrounding tissues and causes unwanted side effects, So it is wise to do treatment at least 24 hours before departure.

 

Please click on the following Clip to watch Dysp. injection procedure

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